BOOKS K-O

 

 

 

DANIEL KEYES

(Flowers for Algernon -- 1966 Nebula Award. Not read. Was the basis for the movie "Charly".)

URSULA LEGUIN

The Left Hand of Darkness --1970 Hugo Award and 1969 Nebula Award

The Earthsea Trilogy --A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore

A type-A fantasy trilogy, but gentle and very well done. Sometimes categorized as children's books, but I loved them (which should tell you something).  Now has been adapted for TV.

(Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea -- 1990 Nebula Award.  I was disappointed.)

 

(The Dispossessed -- 1975 Hugo Award and 1974 Nebula Award -- I thought it was marginal for this list.)

 

(Powers -- 2008 Nebula Award.  Another long-career author!  Not yet read.)

FRITZ LEIBER

(Judging by the awards, I had better start reading some of his work! Somehow I have missed him altogether.)

(The Wanderer 1965 Hugo Award. Read, but left no impression on me.)

(The Big Time -- 1958 Hugo Award -- not read.)

(Our Lady of Darkness -- 1978 World Fantasy Convention Award -- not read.)

JACK MCDEVITT

 

(Seeker -- 2006 Nebula Award.  Not yet read.)

 

VONDA MCINTYRE

Dreamsnake --1979 Hugo Award and 1978 Nebula Award

Really a fine and well thought-out tale, with much modern originality. Richly deserved its awards.

(The Moon and the Sun -- 1997 Nebula Award.  Not read.)

WALTER M. MILLER, JR.

(A Canticle for Liebowitz -- 1961 Hugo Award -- I read it. Marginal for this list, in my opinion. The ultimate in "Catholic" science fiction.)

ELIZABETH MOON

(The Speed of Dark -- 2003 Nebula Award.  An amazingly successful attempt at getting inside the head of someone with mental handicaps and special talents.  I didn't love it, but it is something truly original.)

PAT MURPHY

(Falling Woman -- 1987 Nebula Award.  Didn't think it was that good.)

LARRY NIVEN

*** The Mote in God's Eye (written with Jerry Pournelle)

Paper-thin characterization, but a great concept and a wonderful story.

Ringworld --1971 Hugo Award and 1970 Nebula Award

Really a stunning piece of work. (It has a type A sequel "The Ringworld Engineers" which I didn't like nearly as well. Again, very little new conceptual content.  I believe there are several other books by now, developed around this original idea.)

Inferno (written with Jerry Pournelle)

Not science fiction, not fantasy really. Not sure what it is except a modern version of Dante. But some very strong images and well written.  Sticks with you.